The Resource The crooked path to abolition : Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution, James Oakes, (electronic resource)

The crooked path to abolition : Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution, James Oakes, (electronic resource)

Label
The crooked path to abolition : Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution
Title
The crooked path to abolition
Title remainder
Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution
Statement of responsibility
James Oakes
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "An award-winning scholar uncovers Lincoln's strategy for abolishing slavery in this groundbreaking history of the sectional crisis and Civil War. Some celebrate Lincoln for freeing the slaves; others fault him for a long-standing conservatism on abolition and race. James Oakes gives us another option in this brilliant exploration of Lincoln and the end of slavery. Through the unforeseen challenges of the Civil War crisis, Lincoln and the Republican party adhered to a clear antislavery strategy founded on the Constitution itself. All understood the limits to federal power in the slave states, and the need for state action to abolish slavery finally. But Lincoln and the Republicans claimed strong constitutional tools for federal action against slavery, and they used those tools consistently to undermine slavery, prevent its expansion, and pressure the slave states into abolition. This antislavery Constitution guided Lincoln and his allies as they navigated the sectional crisis and the Civil War. When the states finally ratified the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, it was a confirmation of a long-held vision" --taken from the hardcover
  • Lincoln adopted the antislavery view that the Constitution made freedom the rule in the United States, slavery the exception. Where federal power prevailed, so did freedom. Where state power prevailed, that state determined the status of slavery, and the federal government could not interfere. It would take state action to achieve the final abolition of American slavery. With this understanding, Lincoln and his antislavery allies used every tool available to undermine the institution. Wherever the Constitution empowered direct federal action?in the western territories, in the District of Columbia, over the slave trade?they intervened. As a congressman in 1849 Lincoln sponsored a bill to abolish slavery in Washington, DC. He reentered politics in 1854 to oppose what he considered the unconstitutional opening of the territories to slavery by the Kansas?Nebraska Act. He attempted to persuade states to abolish slavery by supporting gradual abolition with compensation for slaveholders and the colonization of free Blacks abroad. President Lincoln took full advantage of the antislavery options opened by the Civil War. Enslaved people who escaped to Union lines were declared free. The Emancipation Proclamation, a military order of the president, undermined slavery across the South. It led to abolition by six slave states, which then joined the coalition to affect what Lincoln called the "King?s cure": state ratification of the constitutional amendment that in 1865 finally abolished slavery
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
MnSpTMCL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Oakes, James
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
cloudLibrary
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Lincoln, Abraham
  • Antislavery movements
  • Slavery
  • Constitutional history
Label
The crooked path to abolition : Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution, James Oakes, (electronic resource)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Electronic book
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 209-234) and index
Contents
"That glorious fabric of collected wisdom" : a brief history of the antislavery Constitution -- "Freedom is the rule, slavery is the exception" : the emergence of antislavery constitutionalism -- The antislavery project : Lincoln and antislavery politics -- "My ancient faith" : Lincoln, race, and the antislavery Constitution -- The forfeiture of rights : emancipation before the proclamation -- "A king's cure" : Lincoln and the origins of the Thirteenth Amendment
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
  • 1 online resource
  • 288 p.
Form of item
online
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
2me8vz9
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System control number
(MnSpTMCL)2me8vz9
System details
  • Format: Adobe EPUB
  • Requires: cloudLibrary (file size: 1.4 MB)
Label
The crooked path to abolition : Abraham Lincoln and the antislavery Constitution, James Oakes, (electronic resource)
Link
Publication
Note
Electronic book
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 209-234) and index
Contents
"That glorious fabric of collected wisdom" : a brief history of the antislavery Constitution -- "Freedom is the rule, slavery is the exception" : the emergence of antislavery constitutionalism -- The antislavery project : Lincoln and antislavery politics -- "My ancient faith" : Lincoln, race, and the antislavery Constitution -- The forfeiture of rights : emancipation before the proclamation -- "A king's cure" : Lincoln and the origins of the Thirteenth Amendment
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
  • 1 online resource
  • 288 p.
Form of item
online
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
2me8vz9
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System control number
(MnSpTMCL)2me8vz9
System details
  • Format: Adobe EPUB
  • Requires: cloudLibrary (file size: 1.4 MB)

Library Locations

  • Manchester City LibraryBorrow it
    405 Pine St, Manchester, NH, 03104, US
    42.992271 -71.458785
  • West Manchester Branch LibraryBorrow it
    76 North Main St, Manchester, NH, 03102, US
    42.984974 -71.474229

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