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The Resource Doomsday 2012, Catherine Zuckerman, (electronic resource)

Doomsday 2012, Catherine Zuckerman, (electronic resource)

Label
Doomsday 2012
Title
Doomsday 2012
Statement of responsibility
Catherine Zuckerman
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
On December 21, 2012 the world comes to an end according to proponents of the Maya Calendar doomsday club. The blockbuster 2008 movie "2012" showed chaos and destruction of these end times. Predictions include a god coming to Earth, a magnetic polar reversal, the heating of the earth, widespread catastrophe, and utter destruction. The Maya calendar started on August 11, 3114 BCE (corresponding date in the proleptic Gregorian calendar) and will end on December 21 2012. Will it be Armageddon or just another day? The believers are making survival preparations and turning to religious leaders for guidance and solace. Follow National Geographic through the maze of doomsday prophets, cult leaders, and international and historic end times teachings to understand the science behind the Maya calendar and the phenomenon of Armageddon predictions. Scientists and historians know that end-of-days thinking has occurred throughout time around the world. Norse mythology predicted the world would be submerged in water; ancient Greeks believed that Zeus's defeat by his son would be the grand finale. In A.D. 79, Romans thought Mount Vesuvius's eruption in Pompeii was the start of the apocalypse. Jewish, Christian, and Islamic texts all include some writing about end times. The year 1666--feared by many Christians--proved itself to be the year of the Beast when the Great Fire of London visited God's wrath (as widely believed) on the British. Hailey's Comet drove Europeans and Americans into apocalyptic fits in 1910. Individual charismatic figures have led thousands in unfulfilled Armageddon watches. For example, in 1843, spiritual leader William Miller's doomsday prediction failed (The Great Disappointment), but led followers to establish the Seventh Day Adventists. The Jehovah's Witnesses awaited the world's end in 1914. Preacher Jim Jones led hundreds of cult members to commit suicide in Ghana in the 1970s. Pat Robertson was certain Jesus was returning for the Rapture in the 1980s. The leader of the cult Heaven's Gate convinced 39 followers to commit suicide to escape imminent destruction in 1997. And there's no sign of a slow down. In fact, the Internet has spawned a plethora of doomsday cult leaders, from Y2K hysterics to the most recent religious figure Harold Camping, whose rapture predictions of 2011 left his followers earth-bound. National Geographic debunks the myth and illuminates the fascinating realities of the Maya calendar, the 2012 phenomenon, and Armageddon prophecies through the ages
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Zuckerman, Catherine
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Overdrive Inc
  • OverDrive, Inc
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • History
  • Nonfiction
Label
Doomsday 2012, Catherine Zuckerman, (electronic resource)
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781426210068
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
df009f09-2e9e-4ea0-8a2c-7a7da0941d31
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System details
  • Adobe EPUB eBook
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read
Label
Doomsday 2012, Catherine Zuckerman, (electronic resource)
Link
Publication
Dimensions
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781426210068
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
df009f09-2e9e-4ea0-8a2c-7a7da0941d31
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
  • other
  • remote
System details
  • Adobe EPUB eBook
  • Kindle Book
  • OverDrive Read

Library Locations

    • Manchester City LibraryBorrow it
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      42.992271 -71.458785

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